preserving our shared inheritance

The Roger Scruton Centre for the Study of Western Civilisation

The Roger Scruton Centre for the Study of Western Civilisation was founded to honour the memory of Roger Scruton, acknowledge his remarkable contribution to philosophy and to continue his life’s work. Scruton’s philosophy is one rooted in a love for the United Kingdom, but is also valuable and applicable to every unique nation and culture with a desire for a home that is theirs. His concerns were to preserve our home from the entropy of divisive politics, unscrupulous corporations, intolerant public discourse, and the sacrifice of localism for utopianism.

Ideas

Scruton’s philosophy was one of love; love of home, family, music, architecture and natural beauty. He was dedicated to helping others understand the world in which we live, protecting society from entropy through strengthening our institutions, creating civil associations and starting local initiatives.

Focus

The Roger Scruton Centre is dedicated to continuing his work of understanding the unique inheritance of each nation within its own territory. We host discussions at universities, help policy makers keep up to date, strengthen defenders of the West and its allies, and improve public knowledge for the benefit of leaders and citizens.

Partners

The Roger Scruton Centre has built a collaborative network with a presence across U.K. universities, public institutions, government and think tanks. Our partnerships ensure that Scruton’s ideas endure through a new generation of students, public servants, scholars, local activists, politicians, musicians, architects and philosophers.

Our Western Civilisation is not some peculiar, narrow obsession of people who happen to live in a certain geographical part of the world. It is an inheritance, constantly expanding, constantly including new things; something which has given us the knowledge of the human heart, which has enabled us to produce not just wonderful economics and the wonderful ways of living in the world that are ours, but also the great works of art, the religions, the systems of law and government, or the other things which make it actually possible for us to recognise that we live in this world, in so far as possible, successfully.

Roger Scruton